Soy Based Formulas Are Known To Carry Greater Risks Than Benefits For Infants

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By Dr. Marianna Pochelli
PreventDisease.com

Phytoestrogens in soy-based formulas are known to carry greater risks than benefits for infants. Babies fed soy-based formula had 13,000 to 22,000 times more isoflavones in their blood than babies fed milk-based formula. Data published in PLoS One shows that consumption of soy formula may also be associated with a higher rate of seizures in children.

True cancer of the prostate, carcinoma, is seldom seen in infants and children, but other forms of malignant tumors may develop and more cases are appearing in developed nations where the link appears to center around soy infant formula.

While many claims have been made about the health benefits of these estrogen-like compounds, animal studies indicate that soy (both conventional and organic) contain powerful endocrine disrupters that alter growth patterns and cause sterility. Toxicologists estimate that an infant exclusively fed soy formula receives the estrogenic equivalent of at least five birth control pills per day. By contrast, almost no phytoestrogens have been detected in dairy-based infant formula or in human milk, even when the mother consumes soy products. Scientists have known for years that isoflavones in soy products can depress thyroid function, causing autoimmune thyroid disease and even cancer of the thyroid.

Led by Cara Westmark from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, USA, the team explained that the investigation was sparked by mouse studies of a drug that, it was hoped, would inhibit seizures by blocking signals that excite nerve cells.

“It was pure serendipity that we happened to look at soy,” Westmark noted.

Findings from an initial study on mice led the team to investigate the links between soy and seizures in a group of nearly 2,000 infants fed either dairy or soy based formula.

The findings showed that children with autism who were fed soy formula had 2.6 times as many febrile seizures as the children fed non-soy formula in the database. That means 4.2% of the soy group had a seizure associated with a fever, compared to 1.6% of the dairy group, said the team.

“Soy is a widespread ingredient in many food products and 25 percent of infant formulas are soy based, so this is something that needs to be studied,” commented Westmark – who noted that the results of the study do not mean that autistic children who eat soy-based formula are going to develop seizures, and that the vast majority of infants in both dietary groups did not have seizures.

Pediatricians are noticing greater numbers of boys whose physical maturation is delayed, or does not occur at all, including lack of development of the sexual organs. Learning disabilities, especially in male children, have reached epidemic proportions. Soy infant feeding-which floods the bloodstream with female hormones that could inhibit the effects of male hormones-cannot be ignored as a possible cause for these tragic developments.

Other problems that have been anecdotally associated with children of both sexes who were fed soy-based formula include extreme emotional behavior, asthma, immune system problems, pituitary insufficiency, thyroid disorders and irritable bowel syndrome.

Two studies by University of Illinois food science and human nutrition professor Sharon Donovan show that the soy isoflavone genistein, in amounts present in commercial soy infant formulas, may inhibit intestinal cell growth in babies.

Donovan said it’s an important question to ask because almost 25 percent of formula-fed babies in the United States consume soy formula. Although babies on soy formula appear to grow normally, these formulas contain very high concentrations of genistein, from 32 to 45 milligrams, which is higher than the amount found to affect menstrual cycles in women, she said.

“I’m struck by the fact that these babies are receiving isoflavones at such high concentrations,” Donovan said. “Formula is the sole source of nutrition for these infants for the first four to six months of life, when so many important organ systems are developing.”

Next Article: 5 Natural Remedies For Babies That Are Suffering From Colds Or Coughs

Read full article: Soy-Based Formula Linked To Seizures In Children



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3 Responses to “Soy Based Formulas Are Known To Carry Greater Risks Than Benefits For Infants”

  1. Abigal Brauchle Farrah Roth

    Reply to this comment
  2. Elaine Van Berkel

    Apr 20. 2017

    Not good….for babies or anyone

    Reply to this comment
  3. Scott N Gina Armstrong

    Apr 21. 2017

    Yes, soy is an endocrine disrupter. Not good at all

    Reply to this comment

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